costume

medievalpoc:

Garb Week: TV & Film

All of these are just stunningg

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medievalpoc:

jhameia:

chocolattabrides:

ART. FABIOLA JEAN-LOUIS REWRITES HISTORY.
BY SUPERSELECTED · ART, FABIOLA JEAN-LOUIS, HARLEM SCHOOL OF THE ARTS, MIXED MEDIA, PHOTOGRAPHY

Now, this is steampunk. 

In the small details, history that slaps you in the face.

You know, I’m waiting til the end of the summer to do Garb Week again, but I have to say this gorgeous photoset is making me impatient…

“in the small details, history that slaps you in the face”

history-of-fashion:

1884-1910 Alvan S. Harper Collection – Woman holding parasol

Whenever I see photographs – not drawings, but actual photographs – of women in roughly-Victorian dress, I can’t help look at the clear lines of their corsetry and wonder what it must have felt like to wear something that stiff, and like, not just for a costume or special occasion, but every freaking day.

This woman pulls it off beautifully though. Favourite bits: the bow at the side of her neck, her hairstyle, trying to imagine what colour her skirt was (and her top! What if it was a rad shade of AUBERGINE). And of course, wondering: who was she? What made her go into the photographer’s studio that day? Did she want a portrait to give her family? Was she hired as a model, as someone who inspired the photographer as an artist? Was she a singer or a stage performer, being immortalized for her fans?

And then, of course, I’m pretty sure that’s not a real outdoor shot, which means that someone painstakingly painted the background. So now I’m thinking about that painter, whether the photographer gave them creative freedom or micromanaged, or maybe the photographer themselves painted it, as another facet of their art…..

This is why I love history. Numbers on paper are boring as hell. But trying to feel out and understand the lives of people who went through the same people problems and people joys as we do but in different circumstances, that’s exhilarating. ❤ 

ellenkushner:

allthedaysordained:

Io, Don Giovanni is a breathtakingly beautiful Italian film directed by Carlos Saura about Lorenzo da Ponte, Mozart’s librettist for ‘The Marriage of Figaro’, and ‘Don Giovanni’. The costuming is rich and decadent, reflective of both Lorenzo da Ponte and opera’s indulgent lifestyle; and famed cinematographer Vittorio Storaro works his magic once more.

There are more screenshots here: http://allthedaysordained.blogspot.co.nz/2012/03/io-don-giovanni.html

WANT! NEED! MUST HAVE!

I swear for that first one I thought he was checking the fridge for a midnight snack for the longest time

ellenkushner:

ellenkushner:

queenemmaofawesome:

nothingbutthedreams:

jackviolet:

18th century embroidery.

Lovely. I love how flamboyant the embroidery over patterns is. Sometimes what they show in period dramas is so staid and dull that it’d be nice to see more of this.

marquisdesadist

But remember this is all HAND SEWN. So someone was making a living doing this embroidery.  And probably being underpaid.

A friend on FB adds:  “Several
someone’s, probably. In France at least embroidery (broderie a
l’anglaise), braid (passementerie) & buttons were considered 3
distinct crafts that belonged to separate guilds.”

vmagazine:

A UNIQUE STYLE – model: Leila Nda – photographer: Paolo Roversi – fashion editor: Panos Yiapanis – hair: Shuko Sumida – make-up: Val Garland – Vogue Italia September 2015 – featured designer: Valentino Couture Fall 2015

I love every single one of these outfits, and there’s something totally haunting about the weird graininess of the photographs – like royal portraits from another time, another world.