endangered languages

Language Map of NYC

thelingspace:

New York City has a huge amount of linguistic diversity. It’s easy to know that abstractly, but to drive it home, it can help to visualize it, too. And that’s where designer Jill Hubley’s interactive language map of NYC comes in. It’s colourful, fun to play with, and informative. Here’s a look at one fairly broad setup:

The map allows you to have all languages shown, or to exclude English or Spanish, which lets you look at the pockets of diversity below. All the data was taken from
the United States Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, and while that’s not perfect in terms of its characterizations (so many “other” categories!), it’s still a great base to look from.

This kind of diversity is why New York is a great place to do linguistics fieldwork, like that done by the Endangered Language Alliance. If you want to hear more about them, check their site, or our Project for Awesome video from last year!

thelingspace:

We’re supporting the Endangered Language Alliance this year in the Project for Awesome! You can click over here to go vote on our video: http://projectforawesome.com/watch?v=G-_WMSap9kU

If you don’t know about the Project for Awesome, it’s a yearly charity and awareness raising campaign on YouTube aimed at decreasing world suck. Find out more at www.projectforawesome.com!

The Endangered Language Alliance does a lot of really interesting and amazing work, both in documenting and revitalizing language, and they’re worthy of your time and support, even outside the P4A. Check out their website, which has a ton of info about their activities, at http://www.elalliance.org/

DFTBA!

Hooray Project for Awesome! Glad to be participating in this again this year. 

DFTBA!