photography

history-of-fashion:

1884-1910 Alvan S. Harper Collection – Woman holding parasol

Whenever I see photographs – not drawings, but actual photographs – of women in roughly-Victorian dress, I can’t help look at the clear lines of their corsetry and wonder what it must have felt like to wear something that stiff, and like, not just for a costume or special occasion, but every freaking day.

This woman pulls it off beautifully though. Favourite bits: the bow at the side of her neck, her hairstyle, trying to imagine what colour her skirt was (and her top! What if it was a rad shade of AUBERGINE). And of course, wondering: who was she? What made her go into the photographer’s studio that day? Did she want a portrait to give her family? Was she hired as a model, as someone who inspired the photographer as an artist? Was she a singer or a stage performer, being immortalized for her fans?

And then, of course, I’m pretty sure that’s not a real outdoor shot, which means that someone painstakingly painted the background. So now I’m thinking about that painter, whether the photographer gave them creative freedom or micromanaged, or maybe the photographer themselves painted it, as another facet of their art…..

This is why I love history. Numbers on paper are boring as hell. But trying to feel out and understand the lives of people who went through the same people problems and people joys as we do but in different circumstances, that’s exhilarating. ❤ 

nubbsgalore:

striped icebergs form as meltwater refreezes in crevasses atop glaciers before air bubbles can become trapped in the ice, which is later calved into icebergs, or when supercooled seawater freezes inside cracks beneath an ice shelf, which then becomes visible when the iceberg breaks off and flips.

over time, the weight of accumulated snow contorts and curves these blue bands of ice, as does erosion from waves and wind. dust and volcanic ash falling on the iceberg can darken the ice, while dissolved organic compounds entering from below can shade it towards cyan.

accumulated snow also compresses air bubbles trapped in the iceberg, thus preventing them from otherwise interfering with the passage of light. and because water absorbs photons from the red end of the visible spectrum much better than the blue end, bubble free ice takes on a blue colour.

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