Month: September 2014

aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

This post was good but then it got better

Wonderful

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matociquala:

tamthewriter:

scribofelidae:

Holy cats, these are stunning.

How you know there’s a party at Thor’s place.

Pyroclastic lightning. Because volcanoes need to be more intense somehow?

Whoooaahhhhhhhhhhh

I think these are going to have to be my new desktop

thelingspace:

With all the sounds we can make with our mouths, how do we know which ones are important for our language? In this week’s video, The Ling Space takes a look at phonemes, the basic sounds of language, and how we can identify them, how we tell them apart, and how our brains react to them.

I really love sounds, and all the different ways we can use them, so I’m really looking forward to hearing what people have to say about this! ^_^

Big fan of this one, and (SPOILERS) of the second part coming next week! I was way into phonetics and phonology at university, and it’s fun to see the excitement never really goes away. LANGUAGE!

Joder (& nicer ways to say it)

allthingslinguistic:

tesdefonceoutesgay:

spanishskulduggery:

speutschlish:

So in English, we have softer curse words like Dang! Darn! Fudge! and Crap! instead of Damn! F*ck! and Sh*t! (call me a wuss but I really am not comfortable with swears in English – I have to censor them)

In Spain, the most common swear term is ¡Joder!

As in:

¡Joder! Dejé…

I would also like to say that for “mierda” which is “shit”… I’ve heard people say “miércoles” (Wednesday) instead for small children

holy crap, we do the SAME IN FRENCH

“shit” is merde (see mierda in Spanish and merda in Italian) and we say MER…credi (mercredi) in front of children or in more formal situations, which also means “Wednesday”

now, do Italian people say mercoledì instead of merda ??

My favourite are all the softened Québecois swear words, like tabernouche and câlin de bine. Except I can’t use any of them because I don’t know which ones make you sound like a grandmother and which ones make you sound like a polite young person (compare English “darn” with “fiddlesticks”). Pragmatics of minced oaths is HARD.

Fun fact: they all make you sound like a grandmother! Or… at least, like my grandmother? I have distinct memories of her câline de bine, which as a small child I parsed as colline de bines – literally, ‘hill of beans’. I would go around, two-or-three-year-old me, loudly proclaiming my best COLLINE BINE BINE around grownups, knowing with the certainty of my two-or-three-year-old brain that this was how grownups talked and that therefore I was a grownup too.

My parents said they were not amused.

I’m pretty sure they were.

Joder (& nicer ways to say it)

Okay, I have completely fallen in love with the work of Kasamatsu Shiro.

Each of his prints captures so much about the scene it depicts; you can totally feel the temperature and humidity of the air, hear the sounds of rain or waves or crunching leaves or thick and muffling snow, even almost catch the movement of the people inside. They’re so real and snapshot-like that I actually keep forgetting they’re not photographs – not because they’re photo-realistic (although man, check out that detail), but because they are so incredibly evocative that you sort of feel like you’re there. Looking at his work feels like traveling through time and space, where fortunately no one can see you, sitting there, watching the world go by.

– Spring Rain (1935)
– The Sea of Echigo (1957)
– House at Ontake (1954)
– Mt. Fuji from Yoshida (1958)
– Shibu Hostpring, Nagano (1948)
– Shinbashi in Rain (1935)
– Morning Waves (1956)

thewoodbetween:

Shiro Kasamatsu – Night in Summer (1957)

Ahh man, this is so evocative! I can just hear the fireworks and the rice paddy frogs, and feel the warm night air (and maybe some mosquitoes). 

I love how this was done in 1957, but is so timeless. It could almost just as easily be fifty years back or forwards… I’m not actually a person who puts much up on their walls, but I think I’d put up a print of this. 

edwardspoonhands:

all-the-weird-things:

exploratorium:

mashable:

itscolossal:

A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady [VIDEO]

WHOA!

Too mind bending not to reblog!

i feel like this is exactly what Vincent Van Gogh saw and now i am crying 

GOTTA FIGURE OUT HOW TO WATCH THIS IN THE OCULUS!!!

O__O

I wish I could just watch a continuous movie loop of this!!

EDIT: OH MAN I GOT SO EXCITED ABOUT THE GIF THAT I SOMEHOW MISSED THE VIDEO LINK

GO WATCH THE VIDEO YOU GUYS